Can Turmeric help with Arthritis?

Updated: Feb 28


While turmeric latte’s are popping up in cafes everywhere, is there any real benefit to adding this popular rhizome to your food or supplementation? 

Many studies have shown that it’s the polyphenol curcumin that has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant components bringing much attention to this ancient medicinal plant. Frequently used by Ayurvedic and Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners for hundreds of years, western medicine is only now catching on to the health contributions of turmeric.

The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents bring relief to ailments such as arthritis. Arthritis is inflammation of or around the joints creating pain and discomfort. Once thought to be a degenerative disease, it is now known that this type of inflammation is linked to consuming free radicals in food. This can be tricky as toxic laden foods such as hydrolysed fat or shortening, canola oils and margarine are in most packaged foods.

Turmeric is abundant in Vitamin C, Vitamin E and has been noted to help reduce blood sugar levels. Positive results have been seen with digestive disorders like Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel disorder, ulcers, as well as cancer and diabetes.

Whilst turmeric is an affordable and easy addition to your stir fry or curry, it does have a low bioavailability which means you need to take fairly large quantities to receive the benefits. Prevention and consistency is the best cure, so start adding this wonderful root to your meals regularly to receive its ongoing effects.

There are some contraindications to be aware of if using turmeric, especially in high doses. The curcumin properties can cause adverse effects due to its stimulation of the bile and thinning of the blood. Be sure to work with a medical practitioner or naturopath if you are uncertain. Plants can be subtle in their strength yet powerful in their treatment.

Choose wisely. Live vibrantly.


Photo by Free-to-use-sounds Unsplash

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